Tag Archives: Reclaimed Wood

Wall Treatments

Wall paint can be an effective tool and is often homeowners’ choice when designing a space, but in many cases, walls can be an afterthought, taking a backseat to lighting, tile, cabinetry and other selections.  At Bartelt. The Remodeling Resource, we believe walls are a design opportunity, and we often opt for wall treatments in homes to add dimension, texture, and another layer of detail and character.  When done thoughtfully, walls truly become the foundation of good design, creating sophistication, architectural detail, and drama.  Wall treatments allow you to enhance a space’s style without needing to add more stuff to a room.  We’ve rounded up some of the most common wall covering options.

Wood Paneling

Wood paneling can skew contemporary or traditional, depending on size, spacing and stain or paint color. It can also offer formality to a room or lend itself to a more casual look.  Whatever your goal, wood paneling adds warmth and charm to your home.

Hartford Library

Shiplap

Although shiplap is often seen in a modern farmhouse setting, it has gained popularity in many homes.  Painted or stained, horizontal or vertical – shiplap has a raw quality while complementing both rustic and refined spaces.  We have homeowners who forgo drywall completely and incorporate shiplap in multiple rooms in different applications.  This encourages continuity between spaces while creating interest.

Hartford Barn

Wallpaper

With so many options – fabric, grass cloth, metallic, cork, subtle patterns, graphic or geometric designs – wallpaper can complement a contemporary space as well as traditional homes and everything in between.  Wallpaper is an easy way to add texture or drama to a space.  Use it on an accent wall.  Highlight an architectural detail.  Put it in an unexpected spot such as on the ceiling or in a window nook.

Elm Grove Powder Room

Reclaimed Wood

Patina, distress marks, rough edges, wormholes, faded stains – reclaimed wood not only offers warmth to a space but historical charm.  It’s a sustainable option that makes a big impression without overwhelming a room.  On theme with other wall treatments – it’s versatile, complementing rustic homes and creating juxtaposition when paired with more modern or traditional elements.

Wauwatosa Basement Remodel

Tile

From subway to wood-look tile to large format marble and glass tile, there are countless options for your home.  Tile can be laid in numerous patterns, is made of an array of materials, and has many textures, allowing homeowners to express their style and make a statement.

Elm Grove Bathroom

Home Design Is Looking Up | Beams

When designing a new home or updating an existing space, there is a lot to think about. People can spend hours mulling over paint colors, hardware options, cabinetry finishes, and other details, but one aspect that is sometimes overlooked is the ceiling.

The ceiling is just as much a design opportunity as elements such as light fixtures or flooring. It can be an unexpected focal point, drawing visitors’ attention upward and adding character to a space.  

What is one of Bartelt. The Remodeling Resource’s favorite ways to add architectural interest to a ceiling?  Exposed beams.  Their original purpose was functional back when timber frame construction was popular.  With new technology, it became commonplace to conceal beams, but now, many homeowners are opting to incorporate beams, whether faux or functional, for their aesthetic appeal and charm.

Style

Exposed beams are a detail that can complement any style.  Opt for reclaimed barn beams with authentic patina and distress marks to achieve a rustic aesthetic.  Don’t have access to antique beams?  Incorporate new beams that are made to look old – hand-distressing, sanding and custom staining.  Do you have a more modern home?  Perhaps, you want to include exposed steel beams.  Or maybe a warm wood beam is the perfect contrast to other contemporary elements.

Elm Grove Kitchen Remodel

Emphasis

Beams are an opportunity to add visual weight and can help ground a space, adding warmth and texture to make a room feel cozier.  For instance, a room with vaulted ceilings can sometimes feel large and cavernous.  Exposed beams can help scale a living area to create more intimacy.  They can also help emphasize architectural details that may be overlooked.

Hartford Family Room Remodel

Cover

Oftentimes, if a load-bearing wall is removed to open up a room, a microlam header is used to support the structure.  Beams can conceal these less attractive details.  Bonus – they help keep spaces open yet separate, delineating rooms and adding visual interest rather than having one open space.

Elm Grove Family Room Remodel

Warmth

As we touched on earlier, exposed beams can add warmth and variation to a space.  They help soften the formality of a room, and they create dimension, elevating a design without overdoing it.

Elm Grove Family Room Remodel

Bartelt Barn Featured in a “Houzz Tour”

Our custom barn is proving to be quite popular both online and locally.  The latest feature is a “Houzz Tour” highlighting details about the entire project.

The timber frame barn features white board and batten siding, black windows, reclaimed pine, Douglas fir columns, a 73″ chandelier, nickel board walls, and other rustic details.  It is the perfect complement to the 1870s farmhouse on the property.

Click on the photo to read the article!

Bartelt Modern Barn

Check out other features on this project.

New This Week: 4 Fresh Farmhouse-Inspired Kitchens

Practical Comfort

Trending Now: 13 Warm, Inviting Kitchens You’d Want to Wake Up To

Trending Now: The Most Popular Exterior Photos on Houzz

Bartelt Barn Kitchen Featured in Houzz Article

Our modern barn kitchen was recently featured in the Houzz article “New This Week: 4 Fresh Farmhouse-Inspired Kitchens.”

The project features reclaimed pine on the island top and floors, glossy subway tile, large pendant lights, Douglas Fir columns, and custom white cabinetry.

Click on the photo to read the article!

Washington County Barn Kitchen

Bartelt Cover Story in Qualified Remodeler

One of our farmhouse remodels is featured as the cover story in Qualified Remodeler Magazine’s May 2017 issue. Learn more about the project and hear from our very own Rick Bartelt, Matt Retzak, and Heather Scott.

Click on the cover to read the article!

Qualified Remodeler May 2017

Recent Project: Modern, Eclectic Farmhouse Remodel

The 1970s colonial home was dated, compartmentalized, and stale. The homeowners wanted to update their home to accommodate their modern lifestyle and showcase their eclectic style.

The Exterior

Delafield Exterior Remodel Before

The exterior was nondescript, and the homeowners wanted it to be an expression of their style, something that had more character.

Delafield Exterior Remodel

The home was transformed into a modern, eclectic farmhouse. It features low maintenance LP Smartside siding (both horizontal lap and board and batten siding) and trim, a metal roof, fieldstone, and cedar columns and brackets. The wrap-around porch is welcoming, and the layers of lighting give the home a warm glow.

The Family Room

Delafield Fireplace Before

The existing fireplace was drab and cookie-cutter. The homeowners wanted a fireplace that could serve as the focal point of both the family room and kitchen.

Delafield Fireplace Remodel

The new fireplace is the centerpiece of the first floor. The Gold Mica fieldstone is rustic and warm, and the reclaimed farmhouse beam keeps the farm’s history alive.

Also, note the Dutch door to the right of the fireplace. This leads to the new library (discussed soon), and serves a few different functions. First, it is used as a “gate” for the homeowners’ three dogs. The Dutch door also gives the room flexibility – it can be somewhat open to other spaces, or it can be closed completely for more privacy when reading or watching a movie.

The Kitchen

Delafield Kitchen Remodel Before

The existing kitchen, dinette, and dining room were dated, cramped, and lacking personality. They were also closed off from the family room.

Delafield Kitchen Remodel

The new kitchen expanded into the unused dining room and is open to other entertaining areas. It features custom quarter-sawn oak cabinetry, green soapstone and granite tops, a subway tile backsplash, and a painted island with seating. The island’s two levels offer space for food prep and seating, and the open design accommodates the natural flow between appliances, storage, and food prep areas.

The Butler’s Pantry

Delafield Butler's Pantry

The new walk-in pantry uses a portion of the old dinette space. The butler’s pantry not only offers extra storage and counter space, but it tells a story about the family’s past. The sliding barn door was reclaimed from the family’s early 1900s barn, and the pantry cabinetry came from the family farmhouse. These details add historical charm to the home.

The Library

Delafield Library Remodel Before

The three-season room was a catchall and was not practical for year-round use. It was also dated and unsightly.

Delafield Library Remodel

Now, the homeowners can comfortably use the new library year-round. It features a wall of built-in bookshelves that serves as a focal point and showcases the homeowners’ books and treasures from their travels. The shelves also complement the homeowners’ Stickley furniture. The exposed wood ceiling uses wood harvested from an oak tree that had fallen on the family farm years ago – another story to tell.

The Screen Porch

Delafield Screen Porch

The new screen porch is accessible from the family room/kitchen area, the patio, and the porch. It is a great spot to enjoy the home’s scenic backdrop, and it helps blur the line between indoor and outdoor entertaining spaces. The ceiling draws visitors’ attention up and adds texture to the space, with exposed rafters and tongue and groove roof boards.

See this project on Houzz!

Reclaimed.

More and more homeowners are incorporating Delafield Butler's Pantryreclaimed materials in their homes.  Barn doors, brick, wood planks, boards, lighting – the options are endless.  Whether you appreciate sustainable design or want to add historical charm to your home, reclaimed materials have a lot to offer.  Bartelt. The Remodeling Resource explains some of the perks of using reclaimed materials in your remodeling project.

It’s green.

Using reclaimed materials is a great way to give old building materials a “new life” rather than sending them to the landfill.  Whether you’re repurposing an existing light fixture or bringing in antique barn beams, salvaged materials are truly a sustainable practice.

It adds character.Hartford Greeting Room

Want to avoid a “cookie-cutter” home?  Reclaimed details are an opportunity to create unique spaces.  These materials aren’t mass produced.  They’re authentic and one-of-a-kind.  Patina, distress marks, rough edges, faded stains – repurposed pieces add warmth and texture to a home.  They can make a big statement without being overwhelming, and the layering of reclaimed materials with new details offers charm and interest.

It’s versatile.

Reclaimed materials tie in with essentially any style.  They can complement rustic or classic rooms, or they can offer a nice contrast to the simple, sleek lines of contemporary or modern spaces.

It tells a story.Delafield Fireplace

Reclaimed details lend a sense of history to a home.  Where were these pieces and who used them in their past life?  Perhaps, you’re incorporating wood planks from an 1800s barn or Cream City brick from an old farmhouse.  No matter the material, you’ll instantly be adding a timeless quality to your space.

Bartelt’s Matt Retzak in 30West Magazine

“Barn wood is a look back in time; there’s a story in the reclaimed wood that adds interest to the space,” Matt Retzak, designer at Bartelt. The Remodeling Resource.  Check out the “Dwellings” section in 30West magazine to learn more about using reclaimed barn wood in your home!

30West Barn Wood Article

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See the article on page 33 here.

Bartelt in Living Lake Country

We were featured in the Sunday, September 1, edition of Living Lake Country.  The story focuses on using repurposed materials in home remodeling.  Reclaimed items can add charm to a space, helping homeowners navigate away from a “cookie cutter” home.  See what our client and designer, Matt Retzak, had to say in the article!

Living Lake Country Repurposing Article