Monthly Archives: September 2016

Bartelt Wins Silver Award in Master Design Awards

Elm Grove Kitchen RemodelWe recently won a Silver award in the Addition more than $250,000 category in the Qualified Remodeler Master Design Awards.

“We are honored and excited to be recognized in the Master Design Awards,” said Rick Bartelt, owner.  “We could not have done it without the expertise and support of our team, trade partners, and clients.”

Elm Grove Barn DoorsThe winning Bartelt project was originally a 1850s barn and was converted to a home in 1938. With so much charm and history, the homeowners wanted to retain and enhance the home’s original character while accommodating their modern lifestyle. The two-story addition houses a new mudroom, kitchen expansion, hearth room, master suite, and attached garage with a bonus room. Throughout the addition, it was important to create a rustic, yet refined aesthetic. This was achieved with beams, board and batten siding, shakes, layers of lighting, exposed wood, and other selections that acknowledge the home’s barn past.

See more photos of this project on Houzz!

A Look at Tile Layouts

With endless material and pattern options, tile is a great opportunity to showcase your personal style and add interest to your home.  In this post, we take a look at some popular tile layouts to help you choose the option(s) that are best for you and the various spaces in your home.

BrickBrick Tile Layout

The brick, or running bond, layout is that classic subway tile pattern, with each row of tile offset by half a tile width.  It’s a timeless look and is ideal for really any spot in the home.  We often see it as a kitchen backsplash or on shower walls.  Looking to spice up this pattern?  Some of our homeowners opt for a contrasting grout to really define the brick pattern.

Vertical Brick

This layout is that classic brick pattern rotated.  It’s a contemporary twist on a classic and is often used to emphasize height or create an illusion of height.  It’s not uncommon to see the vertical brick pattern on a shower wall.

Large Brick Tile LayoutLarge Brick

A large brick is still that staggered pattern, but it offers a different feel than a typical brick layout.  With fewer grout lines, it can appear to be a more continuous surface of material – a great option for a floor or shower wall.  A fun twist to the large staggered brick look is swapping out a traditional rectangle tile and using a square tile, offsetting the grout joints for an unexpected look.

HerringboneLarge Herringbone Tile Layout

Herringbone is a timeless, elegant tile pattern.  It is created with 45 degree angles that form a ‘V’ shape.  Whether used with the simplest tile or a lovely marble, a herringbone layout adds subtle interest and texture to a space.  Size matters!  The look and feel of your herringbone pattern can be affected by the size of the tile, each option as beautiful as the last – 3” x 6,” 1” x 3,” 12” x 24.”

Basket Weave Tile LayoutBasket Weave

Alternating between horizontal and vertical tiles and often a mix of squares and rectangles, the basket weave pattern is another timeless option.  A basket weave is a great way to add a high-end look to a bathroom floor.

Mosaic Tile LayoutMosaic

Hexagon, square, and beyond – a mosaic is made up of small tiles in a repeated pattern or set of patterns.  Want to highlight a backsplash or niche?  A mosaic pattern is a great way to showcase these details.  It’s also frequently used on shower floors because it is easy to pitch smaller tiles for proper drainage.

Versaille Tile LayoutVersaille

A Versaille tile pattern is composed of four different tile sizes and adds character to your floor.  It is actually like a puzzle pieced together. This pattern is commonly used with a travertine tile for a rustic feel, but it can also be created with a porcelain tile.

Side Note – Borders

Not only do borders add an accent to a tile layout, but they can also be a little “trick” to compensate for imprecise tile-to-wall sizing.  A slightly wider or narrower strip can help you avoid having to cut off tops or bottoms of tiles to make everything fit properly.  It can be a fun option to lay a border in a vertical “waterfall” detail, as well.